P
DOCTOR
Dr. Gil Kaplan
Gastroenterologist
Calgary, AB
Dr. Kaplan is a gastroenterologist and epidemiologist with a clinical and research interest in the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Dr. Kaplan is an Associate Professor and a clinician-scientist in the Cumming School of Medicine at the University of Calgary. Dr. Kaplan sits on the Scientific and Medical Advisory Committee of Crohn’s and Colitis Canada. Dr. Kaplan distinctions include: Avenue Magazine’s Calgary Top 40 Under 40; the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology Young Investigator Award; and the Killam Emerging Research Leader Award. The overarching themes of his research program are: 1) to study the environmental determinants of Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis; and 2) to improve the delivery of care to patients with IBD. Dr. Kaplan’s research has been highlighted in international media including the Reuters, the New York Times, and Scientific American.

Latest

I

Campaign to open bathrooms to Crohn’s, colitis patients launched

If you have Crohn's disease or colitis, when you've got to go to the bathroom, you've really got to

I

A Calgary researcher is recruiting participants for a national Crohn's disease study | CTV Calgary News

A Calgary researcher is recruiting participants for a national Crohn's disease study. The goal is to determine why genetic susceptibility causes disease in some people and not others.

I

Crohn's study gets major funding boost - Calgary | Globalnews.ca

CALGARY- A research study investigating a disease that affects 200,000 Canadians has gotten some major backing. A private foundation in the United States has donated $6 million to the Canadian-led study, while Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of Canada...

I

The GEM Project

Five hundred Albertans are diagnosed with Crohn's disease each year. But the largest investment in the history of Crohn's should help researchers find the cause of the disease. Crohn's and Colitis Canada and the Helmsley Trust have just announced...

I

Do Air Pollutants Play a Role in Bowel Disease?

At 22, Mark Rievaj had one major love: speed skating. Day and night he spent at the Calgary track, vying for a coveted position on Canada's national team. He was having the best season of his amateur career when he noticed a small fissure on his...

I

Cleaner communities more bowel problems: Researcher

Cleaner societies may be contributing to a global increase in cases of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), a local researcher says. Dr. Gil Kaplan, an Alberta-Innovates Health Solutions population health investigator, said his team's study into IBD...

I

Canada tops list of countries for inflammatory bowel disease

An Alberta researcher has determined that Canada and Europe have the most incidences of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which the report suggests is growing in prevalence. The global study on the painful disease, conducted by the University of...

I

Inflammatory bowel disease emerges as a global disease

The incidence and prevalence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are increasing with time and in different regions around the world, according to a new study in Gastroenterology, the official journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. "Insight into the worldwide epidemiology of inflammatory bowel disease is important for the identification of geographic patterns and time trends," said Gilaad G. Kaplan, MD, MPH, of the University of Calgary and lead author of this study. "Our findings will help researchers estimate the global public health burden of inflammatory bowel disease so that appropriate health-care resources are allocated, and targeted research is conducted in specific geographic regions," added Dr. Kaplan, an Alberta Innovates -- Health Solutions population health investigator.

I

Are air pollutants linked to bowel disease risk?

Young people who live in areas with higher levels of certain air pollutants may be more likely to have inflammatory bowel disease than those living under clearer skies, a new study suggests. Specifically, people age 23 or younger were about twice as likely to be diagnosed with Crohn's disease if they lived in a region relatively high nitrogen dioxide levels.